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Portuguese Ginjinha

Portuguese Ginjinha

Ginjinha, or Ginja for short, is a liqueur made from an infusion of sour cherries, also called ginja berries. After a friend from Lisbon introduced us to this delicious concoction, we waited almost a year Pacific Northwest cherries to be in season so we could try to make our own. Our recipe for this liqueur is spiced with cinnamon and cloves to add a spicy, aromatic bite.
Traditionally served in shot glasses for a slow sip with a tart cherry garnish, Ginjinha is also a great ingredient in other cocktails. Try using some in a batch of sangria, or add a bit to your Manhattan for a sweet and spicy twist. As soon as we tried it, Ginjinha quickly became a bar cart staple for its versatility and unique flavor.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Portuguese red wine
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 4 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 whole cloves
  • Half pound tart cherries, washed and stems removed
  • 1 cup grappa or vodka

Preparation

  1. In a small sauce pan, add the red wine and brown sugar, heat and stir until the brown sugar is dissolved.
  2. Add the cinnamon sticks, cloves and cherries to a glass liter jug or container.
  3. Pour in the grappa and red wine sugar mixture.
  4. Keep at room temperature and give the bottle a shake a couple times a week.
  5. The Ginjinha should be ready in a month.

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Cinnamon - Cassia Stick
$3.00
1 oz bag
Cloves
$3.75
1 oz bag

Portuguese Ginjinha

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Ginjinha, or Ginja for short, is a liqueur made from an infusion of sour cherries, also called ginja berries. After a friend from Lisbon introduced us to this delicious concoction, we waited almost a year Pacific Northwest cherries to be in season so we could try to make our own. Our recipe for this liqueur is spiced with cinnamon and cloves to add a spicy, aromatic bite.
Traditionally served in shot glasses for a slow sip with a tart cherry garnish, Ginjinha is also a great ingredient in other cocktails. Try using some in a batch of sangria, or add a bit to your Manhattan for a sweet and spicy twist. As soon as we tried it, Ginjinha quickly became a bar cart staple for its versatility and unique flavor.

Jamie Aragonez