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Annatto Oil

Annatto Oil

Annatto seed is used in Latin American and Caribbean cuisine to give food a rich savory flavor and striking color. The tiny, hard seeds are often infused into oil to make them easier to use, resulting in a deep red liquid that can be kept on hand to quickly add to meat, rice, or other recipes.
The vibrant hues imparted by annatto are surprisingly common. The yellow tint of Latin rice, for example, comes from annatto oil. Annatto extracts are also responsible for making butter yellow, and for the orange color of cheddar cheese.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup annatto seeds
  • 1 cup sunflower or vegetable oil (don't use extra virgin olive oil - it's too strongly flavored

Preparation

Combine seeds and oil in heavy saucepan. Heat over medium heat until the oil & seeds start to bubble. Reduce heat to low. Cook 2 more minutes. (Be careful not to overheat the oil, or the seeds will turn black and you'll ruin the oil.) 

Remove from heat. Let stand at least 30 minutes. Strain, pour into a bottle or jar that has a lid, and refrigerate. This recipe makes 1 cup. The oil will keep up to 1 month in the refrigerator. 

Comments

Annatto Oil

| Sauces & Dressings

Annatto seed is used in Latin American and Caribbean cuisine to give food a rich savory flavor and striking color. The tiny, hard seeds are often infused into oil to make them easier to use, resulting in a deep red liquid that can be kept on hand to quickly add to meat, rice, or other recipes.
The vibrant hues imparted by annatto are surprisingly common. The yellow tint of Latin rice, for example, comes from annatto oil. Annatto extracts are also responsible for making butter yellow, and for the orange color of cheddar cheese.

Sherrie Hahn